Drupal Administration

The Views module for Drupal 6 (also known as Views 2) ships with several default views which allow you to override certain Drupal core list pages. One of the most useful of these views is the view provided for taxonomy term list. Just recently I decided to set up views to override my taxonomy pages so that they would show children terms, but when I jumped into the Views 2 interface and tried to actually do it I was left a little perplexed; if you are reading this page you probably were too.

Want to be kept informed whenever new content is added to Pixel Clever? If so you can subscribe to the RSS for the whole site, or for particular subjects that interest you. Below is a listing of feeds that you may find useful.

The Pixel Clever Blog feed: News, Announcements, commentary on Drupal, project management and on technology in general.
/blog/feed

This page is intended to serve as the base documentation for the Advanced Book Blocks module. Any questions or comments related to the documentation should be posted here. Bug reports, feature request and support request should be filed on the issue queue for the module at Drupal.org. If you are looking for a demo of this module look at the block to your upper right labeled “What I can do for you”.

This page is intended to serve as the base documentation for the Advanced Taxonomy Blocks module. Only questions or comments directly related to the documentation should be posted here. Bug reports, feature request and support request should be filed on the issue queue at the Advanced Taxonomy Blocks project page.

After spending the last week and a half coding like a mad man and testing the thing to make sure there were no glaring bugs I am finally releasing the Advanced Taxonomy Blocks module. This module took a lot more time and effort than I had expected due to the fact that the Drupal api doesn’t provide a taxonomy tree array that gives all of the necessary information in order to integrate with the JQuery menu module and also due to the fact that I had to rewrite a couple of functions in the JQuery menu module in order to get it to open up for other modules to use.

Once you’ve created a page for your site you are probably going to want to add a link to that page at some point. If you had a Drupal developer like myself build your site then you probably already have a couple of menus in place already, but what happens if you want to add a new one?

Well, you can call me and have me do it, but in my opinion that would an expensive option especially since Drupal 6 makes it extremely easy to do yourself.

One of the first questions people ask me after I show them how to create a page in Drupal is “So where is the page now?”. It’s a simple question but the real answer is a little bit difficult for laymen to grasp at first. You see Drupal doesn’t create new files when it creates a new page, so the page doesn’t exist in a folder on the server where you could go download it as is true with some other content management systems. Drupal stores the information to create the page that you see by storing the necessary information in several places in the database.

The Drupal Webform module by Nathan Haug aka “quicksketch” is in my book rates up there in the top ten most important Drupal modules in existence and it’s not that hard to use once you understand how it works. This is a brief tutorial designed to help people get a handle on the Webform module quickly so they can start using it to add web forms to their website. Note: This tutorial is written in the context of Drupal 6. There may be minor differences for Drupal 5 installations.