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I rarely do any heavy structural changes to node edit pages, so until today I hadn’t ever had a reason to disable vertical tabs on a specific content type, but there’s a first time for everything.

Now there are people who recommend turning it off by editing the $conf variable in the settings.php file… however, this is not an option on this particular site since it is running on Aegir, which automatically rewrites the settings.php file. So I had to find another way. I took a look at the vertical tabs code and came up with an easy solution.

Every once in a while you run into a problem that forces you to either dig in and learn more than you really had the intention of learning, or return the client’s down payment. I ran into such a situation recently with an odd Drupal multisite installation.

Drupal handles multisite installs by routing to the folder in the sites directory which has the name of the site in question. So test.pixelcever.com would run off of the settings.php file located in sites/test.pixelclever.com.

This tutorial starts with a situation that can easily occur if you are taking over an existing website from a different developer, and for one reason or another you need to move the site off of the old svn account and on to another one that you or the client control.

There are obviously many ways to achieve this goal, but this is the method that I prefer.

To start open a terminal prompt (or a cywin prompt if you are using Windows) and navigate to the working copy on you local computer. Once in the correct folder type the following command and hit enter:

As of the date of this writing views 2 for Drupal does not have a canned method of accepting multiple arguments that are CCK fields. The case where this came up for me was in a CCK select field that had dynamically generated options (created through php). The options were years, and the user was allowed to chose multiple years. How then, can one set a view to dynamically filter for content that had been marked with at least one of the years sent in the argument?

There are two stages of understanding needed in order to create a template file for a form in a Zen subtheme. The first level in my opinion is to understand how to achieve that same result in a normal theme.

In a normal theme all we need to know in order to create a working tpl (template file) for a form is the form id in question and the format to connect that form to the tpl from within the template.php file.

This document is intended for module developers who wish to make use of JQuery to process an array of hierarchical data into a click and expand menu. It is written with the assumption that you are a programmer and that you know how to create multidimensional arrays through recursive functions.
The only function that third party modules need to call from JQuery menu in order to create a click and expand menu is as follows:

theme(‘menu_creation_by_array’, $menutree, $trail);

This calls the theme function menu_creation_by_array() and sends it two arguments:

The Views module for Drupal 6 (also known as Views 2) ships with several default views which allow you to override certain Drupal core list pages. One of the most useful of these views is the view provided for taxonomy term list. Just recently I decided to set up views to override my taxonomy pages so that they would show children terms, but when I jumped into the Views 2 interface and tried to actually do it I was left a little perplexed; if you are reading this page you probably were too.

The Drupal Webform module by Nathan Haug aka “quicksketch” is in my book rates up there in the top ten most important Drupal modules in existence and it’s not that hard to use once you understand how it works. This is a brief tutorial designed to help people get a handle on the Webform module quickly so they can start using it to add web forms to their website. Note: This tutorial is written in the context of Drupal 6. There may be minor differences for Drupal 5 installations.

Drupal is made to be customized; however some parts of Drupal theming don’t have much documentation written about them. Theming the search form is a good example. I don’t know if someone has added a tutorial in the last couple of months, but when I made the switch from Drupal 5 to Drupal 6 I couldn’t find a tutorial anywhere that explained how to do it, and the function that I had used for Drupal 5 was no longer working. So I tinkered with it a little, and after a bit of trial and error I came up with a method that works.